0 comments on “Weak Links #2: brands, holocaust, art, apologies”

Weak Links #2: brands, holocaust, art, apologies

“Weak Links?”

In 1973 Stanford Professor Mark Granovetter’s “the strength of weak ties” argued that weak links, between people with different opinions, help new and unfamiliar ideas spread.

Strong ties bind friends and families. They encourage group think and build echo chambers. They deter people from thinking broadly, or seeing other perspectives. Strong ties lock you in.

0 comments on “Consistency is the key for brands to meet the test of time”

Consistency is the key for brands to meet the test of time

We talk to Zoe Fenn, director at Flamingo, the global insight and brand consultancy, about how brands need to adapt to stay ahead.  

Zoe FennQ: Zoe, there’s been a lot of talk around the death of the brand, do you think this holds water?

Zoe Fenn: Not at all.  Of course, some of the really big brands that have been around for a long time will fade.  So will many of the new ones.

It’s always been that way.  The brand graveyard always gets bigger.  But that’s different to the death of the brand.

1 comment on “New technologies will redefine workplace models”

New technologies will redefine workplace models

By Joy Frascinella, head of PR at the Principles of Responsible Investment

Joy Frascinella.jpgResponsible investment has steadily moved from the periphery to the mainstream over the last decade.  This is because an increasing number of companies and investors acknowledge that looking at environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues translates into myriad advantages, from improved staff performance to better returns.

1 comment on “We can solve the productivity puzzle by investing in people”

We can solve the productivity puzzle by investing in people

By Patrick Spencer, Head of Work and Welfare Unit at the Centre for Social Justice

UnknownIn his Budget, the chancellor Philip Hammond announced forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) that the British economy will grow by 1.4 per cent in 2018, below previous forecasts of a 1.6 per cent expansion.

The reason? “Regrettably, our productivity performance continues to disappoint,” said Philip Hammond.

0 comments on “Is big business really the big bad wolf?”

Is big business really the big bad wolf?

The big bad wolf is the archetypal menacing predator. Preying on the weak and vulnerable, he has few, if any, redeeming features. For many, this is how they see big business. Recent research by the Legatum Institute showed that the British public holds an unfavourable view of ‘capitalism’ as a concept, viewing it as ‘greedy’, ‘selfish’ and ‘corrupt’. A vast majority, according to the research, would like to see many industries, and the big businesses within them, nationalised.