Weak Links #7: free speech, silence, corporate citizenship, diversity

“Weak Links?”

In 1973 Stanford Professor Mark Granovetter’s “the strength of weak ties” argued that weak links, between people with different opinions, help new and unfamiliar ideas spread.

Is diversity becoming the new conformity?

By Lindsay Reid MCSI, a former compliance recruiter and now an independent compliance consultant specialist

LRNot long ago I heard that recruiters in the banking and finance sector increasingly favour female candidates for some senior roles.  As a former recruiter, I was taken aback, having always applied the basic principles of best-servicing clients by providing a selection of the best available, qualified and experienced candidates.

Getting it done despite the contagion

The Chancellor, Rishi Sunak, delivered what must have been the most important speech of his life today with the nation, and much of Europe, now reaching crisis point.

Having unexpectedly stumbled into the job less than a month ago, he was always going to have his work cut out to deliver this.  And that was before the Covid-19 spectre reared up.

Taking back control or getting things done

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s much talked about Cabinet reshuffle has arrived.

Today is one of the most important days for a prime minister. The power to appoint ministers, rewarding loyal or effective MPs and punishing disloyal or ineffective MPs, is a privilege exclusive to the PM.  Reshuffles allow PMs to exercise their patronage.

Weak Links: General Election special

What next for the Conservatives in Government?  Now the real contest for power and influence.

The Conservatives have a clear majority.  But the struggle for power is not over.  Factions within the party will now vie for control, to implement their version of conservatism.

What’s the likely impact on business and economy?  Here we look at the two likely factions and what to look out for over the next few days.

When two tribes go to war.  Now the contest for power begins.

At the end of January, the United Kingdom will leave the European Union.  When she does so, Dominic Cummings – the most powerful political advisor in a generation – will achieve his life’s purpose and political ambition.  According to insiders, his departure from politics will shortly follow. 

Two powerful factions are in fierce competition to become the dominant political force upon his departure.  The result of this internal power struggle will have a far greater impact on business and the economy than the pantomime of the General Election.

The early indicators: five things to look out for as the new Government beds in

British politics moves at remarkable speed.  With the results of the election hot off the press, Boris will be expected to fully constitute his Government in the coming days.

The Conservatives pledge to ‘get Brexit done’ (you may have heard about this) and the imminent return of MPs to Parliament, further heightens the urgency.

Weak Links #5: digital campaigning, immigration, neoliberalism, business indices

“Weak Links?”

In 1973 Stanford Professor Mark Granovetter’s “the strength of weak ties” argued that weak links, between people with different opinions, help new and unfamiliar ideas spread.