The art of communication

By Victoria Tate, director of Arterial

WARREN HOUSE HEADSHOTSArt appreciation is often dismissed as a leisure activity rather than something which has a wider value to society and commerce. It is an activity that ladies who lunch, debutantes and retired people get up to.  Art is seen as relaxing, something that goes hand in hand with travel, lunching and bucket-list museum visiting.  Art has been denied the status and role it could achieve in the sphere of non-leisure pursuits, in the world of work.

Brexit and impact on diversity and inclusion within the workforce

By Funke Abimbola MBE, general counsel and head of financial compliance for Roche UK

Immigration was one of the thorniest issues of the EU referendum campaign. Highly political and emotionally charged, it is also dominating conversation as we negotiate our exit. And rightly so. Brexit, if mishandled, has the potential to severely damage both diversity and inclusion within the workforce. This would have a detrimental impact on UK PLC’s abilities to compete on the global stage.

New technologies will redefine workplace models

By Joy Frascinella, head of PR at the Principles of Responsible Investment

Joy Frascinella.jpgResponsible investment has steadily moved from the periphery to the mainstream over the last decade.  This is because an increasing number of companies and investors acknowledge that looking at environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues translates into myriad advantages, from improved staff performance to better returns.

We can solve the productivity puzzle by investing in people

By Patrick Spencer, Head of Work and Welfare Unit at the Centre for Social Justice

UnknownIn his Budget, the chancellor Philip Hammond announced forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) that the British economy will grow by 1.4 per cent in 2018, below previous forecasts of a 1.6 per cent expansion.

The reason? “Regrettably, our productivity performance continues to disappoint,” said Philip Hammond.

Making the case for free enterprise

Capitalism is under threat and companies now face a more hostile environment in which to do business than at any time in the last 40 years.

A study by the Legatum Institute, a think tank, and Populus, the market research company, found that there is widespread support for Labour’s nationalisation agenda and much less support for free enterprise. For advocates of free enterprise, anyone who runs a business, and, as should be the case, is merely employed by private enterprise, the report makes sober reading.

Is big business really the big bad wolf?

The big bad wolf is the archetypal menacing predator. Preying on the weak and vulnerable, he has few, if any, redeeming features. For many, this is how they see big business. Recent research by the Legatum Institute showed that the British public holds an unfavourable view of ‘capitalism’ as a concept, viewing it as ‘greedy’, ‘selfish’ and ‘corrupt’. A vast majority, according to the research, would like to see many industries, and the big businesses within them, nationalised.