Weak Links #9: Time to bounce back

How should business rebuild post Cover-19?

The first anniversary of Covid-19 in the UK is drawing close.  Businesses have done what they can to survive and now must plan how to bounce back.  

But how should firms communicate around these challenges?  Is remote working here to stay?  How should responsible firms behave?  

Behaving your way to a more responsible corporate culture

By Sandra Macleod, Group CEO, Echo Research and Britain’s Most Admired Companies

COVID-19 forced itself on an unsuspecting world with tragic consequences.  As global leaders in research on reputation and the drivers of behaviour, we sought to assess the pandemic’s impact on trust and reputation among business leaders and the general public.

“It’s on all of us.” Three things responsible firms do

By Guy Corbet, Fourteen Forty

Worlds away, back in March, “it’s on all of us” is how the then-rookie chancellor, Rishi Sunak, set out the challenges ahead.  “We want to look back on this time and remember how, in the face of a generation-defining moment, we undertook a collective national effort – and we stood together. It’s on all of us”.

Six steps to prepare for the recovery

By Guy Corbet, Fourteen Forty

GCSurvival has been the name of the game, but it is not an end game.

For many firms, the main focus so far has been to batten down the hatches in the face of rising uncertainty.

It is time to start rebuilding.  Gradually, the economy will start to splutter back into life.  We will be at the foot of a tall mountain.

Weak Links #7: free speech, silence, corporate citizenship, diversity

“Weak Links?”

In 1973 Stanford Professor Mark Granovetter’s “the strength of weak ties” argued that weak links, between people with different opinions, help new and unfamiliar ideas spread.

“Don’t be evil”

By Jess McAree, Head of Editorial Compliance, Telegraph Media Group, and independent PR and communications consultant

JMThe man who deals with complaints about editorial content at the Telegraph Media Group makes a robust defence of freedom of speech

“(S)he shouldn’t be allowed to say that. It’s disgraceful.”

Admit it: you’ve privately thought it, or perhaps said it. You may even have written the letter to the Editor, or to my counterparts who deals with complaints on other newspapers. Perhaps you’ve gone further, and taken active steps to stop the person saying it – whatever ‘it’ is.

Getting it done despite the contagion

The Chancellor, Rishi Sunak, delivered what must have been the most important speech of his life today with the nation, and much of Europe, now reaching crisis point.

Having unexpectedly stumbled into the job less than a month ago, he was always going to have his work cut out to deliver this.  And that was before the Covid-19 spectre reared up.