0 comments on “Weak Links #2: brands, holocaust, art, apologies”

Weak Links #2: brands, holocaust, art, apologies

“Weak Links?”

In 1973 Stanford Professor Mark Granovetter’s “the strength of weak ties” argued that weak links, between people with different opinions, help new and unfamiliar ideas spread.

Strong ties bind friends and families. They encourage group think and build echo chambers. They deter people from thinking broadly, or seeing other perspectives. Strong ties lock you in.

0 comments on “Saying sorry can be a good business decision”

Saying sorry can be a good business decision

By Guy Corbet

A poorly handled first response makes a crisis even worse

Guy Corbet

The Apology Clause campaign has been set up to make it easier for businesses to behave with compassion when things go wrong, and to help victims have better recoveries. 

That is because too often, when it feels like a business should say sorry, it does not.  This may be to a customer who has been let down, or someone who might have had a right to expect better than they received.

0 comments on “Giving new life to old words”

Giving new life to old words

By Julie Kangisser, Think Communications

Julie Kangisser photoIs the Holocaust merely a detail of history? This view is rearing its head on the fringes of mainstream political discourse in a number of European countries.

Within a few years there will be no surviving witnesses of the Holocaust.  Second-generation survivors are increasingly feeling compelled to combat the propaganda, hate speech and crisis rhetoric of many leaders today.  The same goes for, those who have survived recent genocides such as those in Darfur, Rwanda and Bosnia.

0 comments on “The art of communication”

The art of communication

By Victoria Tate, director of Arterial

WARREN HOUSE HEADSHOTSArt appreciation is often dismissed as a leisure activity rather than something which has a wider value to society and commerce. It is an activity that ladies who lunch, debutantes and retired people get up to.  Art is seen as relaxing, something that goes hand in hand with travel, lunching and bucket-list museum visiting.  Art has been denied the status and role it could achieve in the sphere of non-leisure pursuits, in the world of work.

0 comments on “Changing the narrative: business on film”

Changing the narrative: business on film

Business creates and sustains jobs, provides families with financial security, and helps fund essential public services such as the NHS.  So why does it get such a bad reception? From politics and the media to the arts and culture, business is often a dirty word, best not spoken.  This is as true globally as it is in the UK.

1 comment on “Brexit and impact on diversity and inclusion within the workforce”

Brexit and impact on diversity and inclusion within the workforce

By Funke Abimbola MBE, general counsel and head of financial compliance for Roche UK

Immigration was one of the thorniest issues of the EU referendum campaign. Highly political and emotionally charged, it is also dominating conversation as we negotiate our exit. And rightly so. Brexit, if mishandled, has the potential to severely damage both diversity and inclusion within the workforce. This would have a detrimental impact on UK PLC’s abilities to compete on the global stage.

1 comment on “New technologies will redefine workplace models”

New technologies will redefine workplace models

By Joy Frascinella, head of PR at the Principles of Responsible Investment

Joy Frascinella.jpgResponsible investment has steadily moved from the periphery to the mainstream over the last decade.  This is because an increasing number of companies and investors acknowledge that looking at environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues translates into myriad advantages, from improved staff performance to better returns.

1 comment on “We can solve the productivity puzzle by investing in people”

We can solve the productivity puzzle by investing in people

By Patrick Spencer, Head of Work and Welfare Unit at the Centre for Social Justice

UnknownIn his Budget, the chancellor Philip Hammond announced forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) that the British economy will grow by 1.4 per cent in 2018, below previous forecasts of a 1.6 per cent expansion.

The reason? “Regrettably, our productivity performance continues to disappoint,” said Philip Hammond.